Month: August 2020

The Book of Knowing by Gwendoline Smith

This is a great book for anybody curious to find out about how your brain works when it is sending you messages of stress and anxiety. What is going on in there when your thoughts are whirling, when you get stuck and can’t make decisions and prevents you from living as you want. This book is a handy book for teenagers but it is interesting for anyone who is interested in the brain and how it works.

It is written in a light hearted way which makes it really accessible. Perfect for any school library. Funny cartoons, hand drawn charts and diagrams make it very user friendly too.

If someone in your life is suffering from stress or anxiety, hand them a copy of this book. But read it yourself before you do.

Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for giving me access to this book.

His & Hers by Alice Feeney

hisThis is a deliciously devious thriller. Twisty and turny and a book to keep you guessing all the way along. This is a gritty book. Plenty of violence to be had, bodies abound, people are horrible to each other and to top it off an unreliable narrator or even more than one. I thought I had this one pegged early on, but it turned on me and messed with my mind and had me trying to figure out exactly how all the pieces fitted together all the way.

This book has really cool narration. The actors are sufficiently creepy which fits perfectly with the story. Positively creepy. Richard Armitage has the perfect voice for Jack, who is investigating the case and Stephanie Racine does a brilliant job of the nuanced role of news presenter Anna Andrews whose ambition sees her chasing murder stories, trying to take down her rivals. There is such a lot going on in this story, double crossing, lies, blind ambition and resentment for things long past. Phew!

If you like your thrillers full of mystery and intrigue and told in multiple voices and in this case voiced really really well, get hold of this book.

Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for giving me access.

The Switch by Beth O’Leary

switchRight book, right time. I was in a bit of a reading slump, couldn’t find something that really appealed on my shelves and then Netgalley released audiobooks. Yay! This was my first and it certainly won’t be my last.

The narrators switch from Eileen a feisty elderly woman, voiced by Alison Steadman with humour and verve and Leena her granddaughter voiced by Daisy Edgar-Jones, who manages to perfectly convince as the frustrated and tired, overachieving businesswoman. I loved hearing their voices, the two different flavours added so much to the story.

Eileen is angry, having suffered her rather insufferable bore of a husband for years, he has taken off with another woman, left her high and dry and desperate for company, and a bit of sex to go with it. Leena has been treated badly at work, a coworker with very mean tendencies has worn her down and she is tired. Her boyfriend who seems so marvellous, is very absent which also doesn’t help. Both these women are still grieving for Leena’s sister who died a year ago from cancer. Then they come up with the brilliant idea of swapping lives, Leena will go to the country, live in Eileen’s house and Eileen will go to London and try the lifestyle there. And in this way, the action begins. There are challenges for both women of many kinds.

This book is fun, full of action, and lots of hilarious moments. Your heartstrings will be plucked, you’ll cheer at the village fair, squirm at the uncomfortable scenes which bring in some big issues such as family violence and infidelity, but overall you’ll have a really fine time. It is a great big dollop of feel-good drama.

Thanks so much to Netgalley and the publisher for access, I had a really good time. Must just up that rating to 5 stars