recipes

Toffee Pop Truffles

As with the previous recipe these form part of the traditional Christmas repertoire for the Schaumann household.  My Mum has been making them for years and now we are all making them.  They are change your life good.  You can only eat them in moderation because they are frighteningly rich.  Although it should be said that the Aitchison children (some or all) have been known to clean up an entire batch of them when their poor benighted mother was out of the house buying their presents!

You can make minty ones (my fave) by using mint slices instead of toffee pops and rolling them in chocolate.

2 packets of Toffee Pops, crushed to fine crumbs in the food processor

125g cream cheese

1/2 cup of icing sugar

1/4 cup sieved cocoa to roll

Beat the cream cheese until soft, then blend in the biscuit crumbs and sifted icing sugar.  Chill the mixture until it is firm enough to roll, then form it into small balls, rolling each ball in cocoa to coat.  Store chilled.  These could also be rolled in chocolate of whatever kind you like.

 

Christmas truffles of minty goodness

Photos will follow later but this recipe is an urgent request from my daughter, hopefully tonight I’ll get the full complement of Christmas goodies on here. Poor blog, lying fallow for so long.

Oddfellow Truffles

1 packet of chocolate thin biscuits

1 packet of oddfellow pepperments

1 tin condensed milk

Before starting you need to realise that oddfellows are hard.  Very hard.  Very not good for your processor blade.  I will not take responsibility for any blades which are damaged (as mine was last year).  Crush the biscuits in the food processor, then crush the oddfellows.  Take out of the processor and examine the poor blade and say to yourself “well this is how you must suffer in the name of Christmas and scrumminess, sorry blade”  Add the condensed milk and mix.  Roll the balls in coconut (or be decadent and roll them in dark chocolate) and dribble white icing over the top (or white chocolate)

Salted Caramel Sauce

Oh My!  There is no way in hell that this is good for you but it is awesomely delicious.  The recipe comes from Delicious Magazine, March 2012.  It is a Nigella Lawson recipe and it has all the hallmarks of her.  It is luscious, silky, smooth and a little bit of elegant fun.  It takes about 5 minutes to make and is soooo worth it.  I recommend eating the leftovers for breakfast.  I had a thought after making it that it would make a lovely tart filling if it was slightly thicker.  Something to work on there.

75g salted butter, 50g brown sugar (I didn’t have any so used palm sugar), 50g golden syrup, 1/2 a cup of thickened cream – normal cream if you live in NZ, 1/2 – 1 1/2 tsp sea salt flakes.  Vanilla ice cream to serve and I used bananas too.

Melt the butter, sugars and golden syrup in a small, heavy-based pot over a medium low heat and simmer.  Swirl the pan occasionally for three minutes. The sauce should turn from gold to dark amber as it cooks – Keep an eagle eye on it, do not allow it to burn.  Carefully add the cream – take it off the heat for a minute or so to do this, add the salt and swirl again.

Give it a stir with a wooden spoon and taste to see if you ant more salt (I did), then cook for a further 1 minute.  Pour into a jug and serve with ice-cream.  Apologies for the terrible photo!

Salted Caramel Sauce with ice cream and bananas.

Peanut Crunch

One of my all time favourites, this is just delicious.  The photo isn’t the best.  What this makes is a peanut full slice which just barely clings together with the mixture.  It will be slightly different each time you make it.  Not really sure why.  The icing is really a crowning glory.  It’s fudgey and caramelish and just goes so well with the base.  Everyone I make this for loves it, and seriously, it takes 10 minutes to throw together, if that.

 

150g butter, ½ cup sugar, 1 desertspoon golden syrup, 1 cup peanuts, 1 cup flour, ½ tsp baking powder, 1 cup rice bubbles

 

Preheat oven to 180 degreesC.  Melt butter, sugar and golden syrup over a low heat.  Chop peanuts in a food processor.  Mix flour, baking powder and rice bubbles together.  Mix everything together and place in slice tin which has been lined with baking paper.  Bake until golden, approximately 15 min.

 

Make the icing while it is cooking with  100g butter, 150g icing sugar, 1 tblsp golden syrup.  Melt butter and golden syrup, stir in vanilla and icing sugar and pour over the base while it is still hot.  Cut when cool into long thin pieces.

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Sinful Citrus Slice

Well this is certainly not good for you.  But there are times when vast quantities of ‘not good for you’ slice is required.  One of those times is when you have to say goodbye to a beloved.  Raisin has died.  It is tragic.  He was deeply loved by all the Schaumann Smith Aitchisons brigade and we all miss him horribly.  A very good cat.  12 years of excellent catness.  Anyway in times of deep abiding sadness one should eat something comforting.  This slice is comforting.

Raisin, in his last days

Read all the recipe first – you might want to revise your quantities in accordance with the notes at the bottom.

 

1 packet of superwine biscuits (I use malt biscuits), 1 cup coconut, 100g butter melted, 1/2 can condensed milk, zest of a lemon.

Crush the biscuits and add everything.  Press into a slice tin lined with baking paper.  Makes basic slice.  But wait there is more.

To make it stupendous!  Crush up 1 block of Whittakers white chocolate and macadamia chocolate, add to the rest of the ingredients which you have doubled.  Seriously you can’t go back after you’ve made it with the chocolate.  It just becomes totally amazing.

Ice with icing made with icing sugar, butter, zest of orange, lemon and juice from them.  In my opinion it only needs a skiff of icing.  The photo below shows it with too much icing, it becomes a bit sickly if you have too much on there.

Gingerbread – winning warming flavour

A big slice of this is currently waiting on a plate beside me as I type.  It’s great stuff, the spicy flavour is just what you need on a wintery night.  I double this recipe, make two loaves and freeze one.  Perfect when your sister comes to visit, just like today, and you can whip the frozen one out and warm it though in the microwave, cut into thick wodges and slather with butter (or have with blue cheese if you like too, dried fruit is good, cream cheese – gingerbread goes with heaps of things).  If you wanted you could add some crystallised ginger to the mixture for extra spiciness. 

150g butter, 1 cup low fat milk, 1 cup golden syrup (or half golden syrup and half treacle), 1/2 cup brown sugar, 2 tsp baking soda, 2 1/2 cups flour, 2 1/2 tsps ground ginger, 1 tsp cinnamon, 1 tsp ground cloves

Melt the butter, milk, golden syrup (and treacle), and brown sugar in the microwave.  Stir until all mixed together.  Heat until it is all bubbling hot.  While it is heating sive all the dry ingredients into a bowl with the exception of the baking soda. Take off the heat and then stir in the baking soda (it goes irritatingly lumpy so give it a decent beating).  When it is fizzing stir into the dry ingredients.  Mix until smooth.  Pour into loaf tins and bake at 180 degrees C until the sides shrink away from the sides and the centre is firm and springy.  Don’t tip it from the tin immediately, leave in for a good ten minutes and then tip  onto a wire rack.

Tomato Kasundi

This is magnificently hot.  Hotter than a January Central Otago day. Hotter than hot sauce?  Well about the same as hot sauce. It is an Annabel Langbein recipe and it was recommended to me by my friend Judith who thinks it the best thing ever.  Thought I’d make it as the glut of tomatoes is ever present at the moment.  After I’d made it and frightened my taste buds a bit by it’s hotness, I had to find ways to use it.  It has a great deeply curry spicy taste.  So far we have had it with corn fritters, in guacamole, and to spice up a pasta dish.  Lots of uses and very tasty.

The quantities of the spices are really large.  Check your supplies before you start!

225g green ginger – grated, 100g garlic cloves peeled and chopped finely, 50g green chillies – I used red – sliced in half, seeds removed, 2 1/2 cups malt vinegar, 1 cup canola oil – I always use ricebran – 2 tblsp turmeric, 5 tblsp ground cumin, 3 tblsp chilli powder, 5 tblsp mustard seeds ground to a powder, 2 kg tomatoes chopped, 2 1/4 cups sugar, 3 tblsp salt.

Puree the ginger, garlic and chillies with a little of the vinegar to make a paste.  Heat the oil in a very big pot or preserving pan.  Add all the ground spices and fry until they exude a fragrant aroma.  Add the pureed paste, tomatoes, the rest of the vinegar, sugar and half of the salt. (Check near the end of cooking to see if more is required.) Cook over a low heat, stirring occasionally, until the oil floats on the top – about half an hour (I cooked it a lot longer).  Bottle in steralised jars while hot with a thin film of hot oil on the top of each jar to prevent the top from drying out.  cove with screw top seal lids.  Leave for a couple of weeks for the flavours to develop before using. Store in a cool place until you want to use it, it lasts indefinitely.  Makes about 2 litres.

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Cinnamon Oysters – go on just try them

A childhood favourite, I remember these as being very special occasion goodies. Recently we were going through the house of a very elderly lady recently on a house hunting expedition, and there they were in the garage sale going on outside, cinnamon oyster tins. The lovely lady selling them game them to us because they were about all that was left of the treasures and I was thrilled and delighted. Now that I have whipped up a batch of these and realised how incredibly quick they are to make, and how much people love eating them they are going to be made regularly.  Light, fluffy, a little air filled morsel with yummy cream filling.  Ooooohhhhhh.

2 eggs, 1/4 cup of sugar, 6 tblsp golden syrup, 6 tablespoons of plain flour, 1 tsp baking powder, 1/2 tsp baking soda, 1 1/2 tsp cinnamon, 1/2 tsp ground ginger, whipped cream to fill them sweetened with a little vanilla and icing sugar.

Beat eggs and sugar until thick. Add golden syrup and beat well, Sift flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon and ginger together.  Fold dry ingredients into egg mixture.  Spoon small amounts of mixture into greased sponge oyster or finger tins.  Bake at 200 degrees C for 10 to 12 minutes or until the surface springs back when lightly touched.  When they are cold cut the oysters open with a sharp knife and fill up with whipped cream, dust with sieved icing sugar.

This is basically the Edmonds Cookbook recipe with more cinnamon in it.

 

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Classy Ambrosia

Nectar of the gods, ambrosia is heaven on a spoon

Summer deserts are all about fresh fruit for me.  This is a made up recipe, well it is really just a method and you can play around with it as you wish, adjust to whatever fruit you have available, you could make it with apricots (and apricot yoghurt), rhubarb etc.

In a nice big bowl put in the bottom good thick berry yoghurt, over the top sprinkle some marshmallows, over these layers add a pile of berries, it doesn’t matter what type and I used frozen this time but fresh is best.

In another bowl mix together whipped cream and a small pottle of cream cheese with a couple of desert spoons of icing sugar and some vanilla, this is your next layer then repeat the layers in so far as you have room.  Ending up with a good layer of the cream cheese mixture on the top.  Decorate with some spare marshmallows.  I have a new microplane chocolate grater so everything I make has grated chocolate on it at the moment, therefore this desert has grated chocolate!

 

Ginger Biscuits – so easy!

This ancient recipe has been around since well before my kids were mixing up biscuits in the school holidays, turning the kitchen into a floury, sticky mess, but this is one of the recipes we used to make together.  They are perfect for the beginning baker, melt, mix and cook.  The measurements are in old measurements on my original recipe so I have changed them to metric measurements.  Eat lots of them with big mugs of milky tea!  Tip: Castor sugar will mix in better than ordinary sugar, but it doesn’t really matter much in the end.

Morning Tea on a rainy summer day

Melt together, mix, then cool a little:  125g butter, 1 tablespoon of golden syrup, 1 cup of sugar.

Add:  1 beaten egg, 1 teaspoon of baking powder, 3 teaspoons of ground ginger, 2 1/2 cups flour, 1/2 teaspoons of baking soda, you can add some chopped chrystalised ginger if you like a stronger ginger taste.

Roll into balls, do not flatten.  Bake at 180 degrees for about 20 – 25 minutes until golden.

Lime and White Chocolate Brownie

This recipe started life as my friend Carole’s chocolate brownie.  You might notice that the photo below of my version bears little resemblance to a chocolate brownie, I felt like a brownie, I only had white chocolate buttons and I happened to have a lime begging to be used, so voila Lime and white chocolate brownie was born.  It has a lovely soft centre and chewy edges. Yum!

This would make a great desert with yoghurt to cut through the sweetness or even some rhubarb.  We however ate it as the consolation prize for a very disappointing first course most of which ended up in the bin!  This saved the day!

Melt these together gently: 100g butter, 1/2 cup of white chocolate buttons.

Whisk in: 2 eggs, grated rind of a lime and it’s juice and 1 tsp of vanilla.

Stir in: 1 cup of sugar, 3/4 cup flour.

Pour into: a tin lined with baking paper.

Bake at: 180 degrees C for 25 minutes.

Spicy Green Dipping Sauce

In the last two weeks I’ve made this 4 times!  It is that good!  It has been served with spring rolls, corn fritters, crayfish and as a salad dressing.  Zingy, tangy and so easy to whip up as long as you have some palm sugar and some fresh herbs I think everyone should have this in the fridge for all occasions.  I’ve taken to having it sitting in a bowl handy.  It goes really well with cucumbers, tomatoes and avocados too!

If there was ever an argument for getting yourself a very efficient, sharp microplane this is it.  Making it so much more efficient for grating the palm sugar.  If you didn’t have any palm sugar, which is in all the supermarkets I shop at, you could use brown sugar but properly brown sugar not the pale brownish sugar I see all the time.  Palm Sugar tastes like Russian Fudge, really, it does!  YUM.

40g of palm sugar, 2 tablespoons of lime juice (or lemon), 2 tablespoons of fish sauce, a spoon of out of the jar chilli, and some grated ginger (to taste) (out of the jar if you want), crushed garlic (out of the jar again or freshly mashed to a pulp with the side of a knife).  A handful of finely chopped coriander and an equal amount of finely chopped fresh mint.

Grate the palm sugar into the juice, then add the fish sauce and stir until the sugar is dissolved.  Add the rest of the ingredients. Set aside for a little while for the flavours to blend nicely.

Corn fritters anointed with Spicy Green Sauce

White Cake

On Sunday I turned 50.  There, I wrote it.  Hard to believe I’m so extremely old, anyway when you are this old you can choose your own birthday cake.  I chose a White Cake.  I’ve made it before, for a friend’s birthday and I always remembered how gorgeous it was.  I had found the recipe in a Taste Magazine and then lost it.  Then, the other day hunting through some papers for something else I found it.  It has taken me an age to find it online anywhere now so I am posting it here in case I lose it again.  It is the most wondrous cake!

This cake is moist with the subtle flavour of almond and vanilla.  The chopped up almonds give it a bit of body and crunch which makes it really unusual.  It is a big celebration cake and while this recipe is for two cakes, you could make one big one.

The cake: 1 and 1/2 cups of sugar, 250g butter, 1tsp vanilla, 2 and 1/4 cups self-raising flour, 1tsp baking powder, 300ml milk, 1 cup finely chopped almonds (blanched), 6 egg whites beaten to stiff peaks

Cream the sugar, butter and vanilla.  Sift together the flour and baking powder, three times. Yes three times.  It is traditional and important.  Add the flour mixture to the creamed mixture alternatively with the milk and then stir in the almonds.  Gently fold in the egg whites.  Pour into two greased and floured cake tins, and bake at 190 degrees C for 30 minutes.  Insert a skewer into the cake to test whether it is cooked.

Icing:  60g butter, 250g cream cheese, 3 cups icing sugar, vanilla or lemon juice.  To make the icing, cream the butter and the cream cheese.  Add the icing sugar and vanilla or lemon juice to taste.

To assemble:  sandwich the 2 cakes together with some of the icing. Cover the top and sides with icing, smooth and chill.

From Taste magazine, August 2006

Feijoa Cake

This is moist and yummy.  Only for those who really like feijoas of course, but if you like them you really like them.  The season is so incredibly short and they go off really quickly, so best get them inside you quickly!

Credit for the recipe goes to the lovely Michael.  He is in Year 11 at school and this is his Mum Alison’s recipe.  Michael gave me a piece of this cake one morning because he is a kind hearted young man and I have been dying to make it ever since.  I can thoroughly recommend it.  it certainly went down a treat at Bookclub last night.  The recipe originally comes from somewhere called Top of the dome, but I don’t know where that is.

300g self-raising flour

1 1/2 tsp ground cinnnamon

Photo from teara.govt.nz

1/2 tsp salt

250g demerara (or brown) sugar

125g butter, melted

2 large eggs, lightly beaten

175ml milk

250g feijoas, peeled and chopped

Heat the oven to 180 degrees C.  Line your cake tin with baking paper and grease lightly.  Works in round or square but it is quite a big cake.

Sift the flour, cinnamon and salt into a bowl.  Stir in the sugar and you can put in some raisins or cranberries at this point in you want (I don’t want)

In a separate bowl mix the butter, eggs, milk and feijoas and mix until smooth.  Combine the two mixtures and pour into the cake tin.

Bake for 35 – 45 minutes or until the cake is springy in the middle when you give it a little poke with your finger.  Take out of the oven and let it stand in the tin for a good 5 minutes.  Then, when coolish tip it out and put onto a wire rack to cool.  Serve it warm as a desert with cream or yoghurt.  Yum.

Pear Ginger Muffins

Autumn means pears!  Lovely juicy and dripping with sweetness.  I love pears.  So I made up this muffin recipe, well I should probably say I adapted a muffin recipe lurking in my folder.  I have always loved the combination of pears and ginger, I remember going to my grandmothers place when she had made pear ginger jam and thinking she was incredibly clever to have made something so lovely.  Must find out if an aunty has the recipe actually.  Here is a quick easy way to use up the pears which are getting overripe in the fruit bowl.

1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 cup brown sugar, packed
2 1/4 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon of ground cloves
1 teaspoon ground ginger (more if you like)

1 teaspoon vanilla essence
2 small pears, peeled and chopped finely
1 egg
1/2 cup yoghurt, plain (or use milk if you must)
1/2 cup butter (melted)

Preheat oven to 180 degrees.
Sift the dry ingredients into a large bowl

Mix together egg, yoghurt, vanilla and melted butter, add the chopped pear.  Stir into dry ingredients until just combined. Do not over-mix or your muffins will get all peaky and tough and holey!  Put into greased muffin tin or in my case little loaves tin.

I think you could add walnuts if you wanted a little bit of extra crunch or crystallised ginger if you want a bit of extra bite.

Tuna and Lemon Pasta

This living alone business is tricky, well not so much the living but the cooking for one.  Every time I make something I make far too much of it, then I end up having to eat it for days and days and get tired of it, then it goes in the bin.  So I need to make quick, easy, healthyish food that fits in a bowl, with only a bit of leftover which can be taken to school for lunch the following day.  This is that recipe at the moment, I’m a little fixated on it.  Try it is is yummy.

This isn’t a recipe it is more of a method.

Cook some pasta – long pasta I think rather than spirals or other short types.  Drain it when cooked.

When it is cooked tip a small can of tuna with lemon and pepper flavour over the top and add some spinach leaves, some chopped fresh parsley or chives and mix them through the pasta.  Spring onions are good too!

Grab a lemon, grate a little bit of the zest finely and save it, squeeze the lemon over the pasta, sprinkle the zest over the top and add a grinding of black pepper and the zest.  If you have some lime flavoured oil, such as the one in the photo I think you should add a dash of this as well, delicious.

Voila dinner is ready

Green Mayonnaise (our potato salad dressing)

Photo by Tessa Aitchison

Xmas has been and gone and New Year looms.  At this time of the year I seem to spend most of my time cooking for other people – a lot.  I get a bit stressed and end up making a lot of food to take to other people’s places,  so I need to take things that travel easily and unmessily and which most people like.  Potato salad is one of those things.  I think that on that potato salad you should try this dressing.

It is the dressing of choice here for potato salad,  but is equally good with crunchy carrot sticks or other little things which need a dip, you can make it thinner just thin with a little water, it is a very thick dressing.  It is perfect on sandwiches with leftover turkey or ham or lamb.  It is just grand!  The original recipe comes from Susan who is the Mum of my friend Rebekah and it works every single time.  I know that lots of people are a bit frightened of making mayonnaise but this one is trouble free and has never disappointed.  Feel free to double it.  Keeps ages in the fridge in a jar.

Use any herbs you have to hand, but I always have basil mint in my garden at this time of year, it is too cold to grow basil here and mint is patchy for me so I grow basil mint, and have mountains of it so it goes into everything salady.

You need: 2 eggs, 1 tsp salt, 1 tsp mustard (whatever type you have), 1 clove of garlic, 1/4 cup white wine vinegar, 1 tsp sugar, 1/4 to 1/2 cup of herbs, about 2 cups of oil (I use rice bran)

Add the eggs, salt, mustard, garlic, vinegar and sugar to the food processor and press go.  Beat for a bit then add the oil in a slow stream with the motor running.  I do it a cup at a time and don’t get too panicky if it seems to be going too fast, this is a forgiving mixture.  I add the herbs last and taste.  Adjust taste to suit you.  Stand for 30 minutes and use with reckless abandon.

Rhubarb and date cake

First rhubarb harvest of the season and I have a bumper early crop.  You have to keep on harvesting to keep it cropping.  The first stalks are always the best coloured and such a joy to use.  Rhubarb is so Mumsy and Grandmumsy and while round here the ultimate cool evening treat is a Rhubarb Crumble this cake recipe is great to make because it is easy, requires no concentration and you can eat it on a sunny spring day not just cool wintery nights.

This recipe is a really easy and comes from a fantastic book which was put out last year by Samuel Marsden Collegiate School in Wellington.  My friend Rosalba sent me a copy which has been used and used in my kitchen and is looking rather stained and well loved.  That is really the ultimate compliment for a cookbook, you can judge my good cookbooks by the stains.  I make the recipe slightly differently from the instructions in the book, using my food processor to mix the butter into the flour, but you don’t have to.  It makes a moist cake – pudding style, and is totally delicious.  The standing time is important to firm it up, don’t rush it even though the smell will be tempting you to hurry it along.

I think on a cooler night this would be fantastic with custard or yoghurt, but it is warm at the moment and so I served it just by itself in big generous slices.  It was all gobbled up in about 10 minutes by the four of us.  The ultimate sign of a great cake!

170g self-raising flour, 100g margarine (I always use butter), 120g caster sugar, 250g rhubarb (approx 6), 120g chopped dates, 1 large egg, about 4tblsp milk

Preheat oven to 170 degrees C  and Grease and line a 20cm cake tin.

Sift flour, add margarine (or butter) chopped into small pieces. Rub in until evenly distributed (or blitz in food processor), then stir in the sugar.  Wipe and cut rhubarb into small cubes then add to flour, add the dates with milk together and stir into other ingredients.  Bake for 35 minutes or until the top is golden and gorgeous.  Cool in the tin for 10 minutes then turn onto a wire rack to cool.  Freezes well.

Cheese Puffs – the partygoers friend

Cheese Puffs with Cream Cheese and Pink Peppercorn spread

These are easy, yummy and very quick to make.  For those holding their own parties or even those with household members prone to snaffling things straight out of the oven you should double the recipe.

Serve them just by themselves as little pop in your mouth treats or serve them with the Cream Cheese and Pink Peppercorn dip – click here for the recipe.

They are going to get your food processor dirty and sticky but it is worth the horrible washing up procedure because they are just so good.

The original recipe comes from I Hate To Cook by Jill Dupleix which is just the coolest book and somewhat of a mainstay around my kitchen, even though I quite like to cook.

The Recipe

1 cup water, 3 tblsp butter, 1/2 tsp salt, 1 cup plain flour, 2 eggs, 1/2 cup of grated cheese (you can use any sort you like, I’m partial to feta but it really doesn’t matter, stronger tasting is better though), a little mustard is a good addition.

Heat the water, butter and salt until it is boiling and the butter is all melted.  Add all the flour at once and turn down the heat.  Beat like a crazy thing with a wooden spoon until the dough leaves the sides of the pot and forms a ball.  Keep cooking and stirring for a couple of minutes.

Transfer the gluggy mixture to the food processor and process while you count to 15, add the eggs and beat for 45 seconds.  Throw in the cheese and pulse a little until it is all mixed through.

Put teaspoons of this mixture onto a baking tray and bake in an oven of about 200 degrees C.  Don’t undercook or they will be gluggy inside, they should be goldeny delicious.

 

 

Melting moments – meltingly good

I love melting moments.  It is simply as simple as that.  They are yum in a bun!  Yet certainly not a bun!  However this love of melting moments is not all encompassing.  There are melting moments and melting moments.  Quality control is key to the melting moment.

  • Dry – is not allowed.
  • Flat and skinny – is not allowed (no one who truly loves melting moments is either flat or skinny it must be said)
  • Too much butter (unbelievable but there is such a thing)
  • Not enough icing in the middle is a crime against the melting moment.  Squishy icing is bad too!  It should be nice hard and thick icing.
  • Too brown is just wrong – don’t look too closely at the photo
  • Too dense – the ‘mouth feel’ will be dry like that peanut butter sticking to the roof of your mouth thing.  Bleugh!
  • Too dry – see above.

So, all in all it is a tricky thing the melting moment, but I think you should try this recipe.  It comes from something called Cafe Cafe.  No idea who wrote it or where it came from but that is the name on the photocopied page.  I’ve had it for at least 10 years and the recipe works every time gorgeously.  It is attributed to Joan Campbell in the book.  Another point:  you can make ’em tiny, you can make ’em huge but make lots, they disappear in a very short time.

I always double this recipe!  Turn oven to 160 C.

250g butter, 4tblsp icing sugar, 4tblsp cornflour, 1 + 1/2 cups of plain flour

Beat the butter and icing sugar together and then gradually beat in the cornflour and flour.  Mix well.  Turn the dough onto a floured surface and roll out to a 1 cm thickness.  Cut into rounds and place on a non-stick baking tray, making a small indent with the flat of a fork on each biscuit.  Bake for 10-15 mins or until golden and firm.

The icing:  1 1/2 cup icing sugar, 2 tblsp butter – softened, 1 tblsp vanilla (oh yes really!) Make in the usual way and use it to sandwich two biscuits together.  Or one of any of these are allowed:  a grating of lemon or orange zest.  a squirt of lime juice, passionfruit pulp added to the mix.

I really think you want a nice tart icing, to contrast and cut through the butteryness of the moments as they melt in your mouth.

Go on – you know you want to make them!